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Joan Macy School

Joan Macy School


Joan Macy School is a specialized, non-public school for at-risk students grades 1-12, who are placed with us by their local school districts. Practical instructional skills are integrated into the classroom experience to promote the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in society today. Students follow school district graduation requirements, with special guidance for those behind schedule. We also offer exposure to community activities such as field trips, dual enrollment, regional occupational programs, and full mainstreaming back to public school as appropriate.

We offer individual and crisis counseling, behavior management training, social skills training, transitional and vocational training, speech and language therapy, door-to-door transportations, healthy living and physical education, and one-to-one services.

Eligible students have access to the San Antonio and East San Gabriel Valley Regional Occupational Programs and an on-campus Work Experience Program, where students gain hands-on job training and earn both a work allowance and vocational credits.

We adhere to the Common Core State Standards developed by the State of California. Individualized adaptations to curriculum are done on an as needed basis. Math curriculum includes California-adopted My Math, California Math Course 1-3, and Core Curriculum Integrated Math I & II. Our English Language Arts curriculum includes California adopted California Journeys and Collections California.

 


JMS Documents

Photo Credit Joanne Wilborn and Marlyn Woo

Street Law Clinic

Understanding their place in society is important for all young adults. To this end, Joan Macy School has many for years partnered with the Street Law Clinic offered by Professor Laura Dym Cohen through Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles. The clinic teaches legal life skills to high school students at Joan Macy School and throughout Los Angeles County. Law students step into the roles of teacher, mentor, and advocate to empower at-risk youth to make better choices, overcome adversity, and build stronger futures.

These participatory lessons inform the teenagers about their rights and the laws that apply to them, and provide legal information and resources they need to successfully transition to independent living and adulthood. Law students teach a weekly 90-minute lesson using active-learning methodology at sites arranged by the clinic director, as well as meet with their students individually to ensure that each has a plan as they leave high school. Based on this plan, the law students prepare a resource binder specific for each youth that targets their needs and interests, focusing on housing, employment and education.

For more information on Street Law Clinic, contact:

Laura Dym Cohen
Clinical Professor of Law and Director
Street Law Clinic and Public Service Programs
Southwestern Law School

Photo Credit Julie Griffith

12 Ways to Celebrate National Wellness Month

When you think of the word “wellness” what comes to mind? Maybe it’s physical activity and focusing on being healthier. Or, maybe you’re reminded of self-care and the power of focusing on mental health. Wellness can take on a variety of meanings, and this August you can celebrate National Wellness Month by recognizing all forms of wellness with these 12 ideas. Check out our examples below for physical, mental, financial and community wellness!

 

Physical Wellness

  • Eat More Fruits and Vegetables. Is half of your plate green? Could you eat more fruits daily? Set a goal to increase the amount of fruits and veggies in your diet, starting wherever you are and increasing by a small amount until you’re ready to increase that number again!
     
  • Exercise 30 Minutes a Day. That’s right, we’re only asking for 30 minutes of exercise per day! Plus, it doesn’t have to be a crazy hard workout. Even elevating your heart rate by going for a walk or jog can help lead to many physical health benefits.
     
  • Drink More Water. Many of us try, yet don’t succeed, at drinking enough water daily. Keep track of how much water you’re drinking and mark off your 8 glasses a day. Getting enough water can help you feel full faster, aid in digestion and help your physical health overall. 

 

Mental Wellness

  • Talk to a Counselor. Everybody can benefit from talking to an unbiased third party about what’s happening in their lives. Do your research and find a counselor that works for you. 
     
  • Prioritize Self-Care. Remember that it’s okay and necessary to put your mental health first. It’s easy to lose sight of what you need when you’re taking care of others. Make time each week for your own self-care habits.
     
  • Say “No” to Draining Activities. You can only give when your metaphorical gas tank is running on full. If you don’t have it in you to do something, simply say “no” instead of draining your energy to please others. 

 

Financial Wellness

  • Build a Budget. Finances can be scary, especially if you don’t have a good pulse on what’s coming in and what’s going out. Develop a budget to help keep track of your spending and savings goals. That way, you can work toward building your finances and have a better handle of what is moving in and out of your account.
     
  • Set a Savings Goal. Sometimes saving seems impossible. However, small goals add up to big amounts over time. Consider what is feasible for your finances and commit to saving an amount each month. Then, watch as your savings grows!
     
  • Plan for Emergencies. Much like building a savings, develop a separate fund or amount to set aside for emergencies. This will help create security when the unexpected happens.

 

Community Wellness

  • Volunteer. Lend a helping hand and pitch in to make your community a better place. Whether you invest your time in other people, community programs or making your community a better place, volunteering contributes to community wellness overall.
     
  • Donate. If you’re able to give back, it not only has a huge impact on the success of your community, but also on your health and wellbeing! Studies have shown that philanthropic efforts have been linked to happiness. 
     
  • Start a Fundraiser. Take the time to organize people in your community to give back. Start a fundraiser for a local business that inspires you or an organization that does good in your local community. 

 

Take advantage of the simple ways to find total wellness during August to celebrate National Wellness Month. While wellness does refer to your mental and physical health, it can also stretch beyond to include the people around you and the way you set yourself up for success financially. Work on taking small steps to contribute to your overall happiness and wellness.

Our Impact This Year

  • Youth & Families Served

    785

  • Volunteer Hours

    1148

  • Youth Internship Hours

    231

  • Housing Provided

    46

© 2022 David & Margaret Youth and Family Services

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